Rennie

Marketer: Bob Rennie

During a career that spans more than 40 years, Bob has marketed landmark projects in Vancouver, Seattle and further afield, all the while developing brand recognition for his company, the ubiquitous rennie.

Avenue
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Bob Rennie

Avenue is one of those rare environments where you may never see your parking stall because you can walk and do everything right there.

Social Engineering
Bellevue’s New Icon

How can we be best in class? That is the question Andy Lakha and Bob Rennie pondered as they walked around the future site of Avenue, nestled right in the heart of Bellevue. It all starts with a great idea and then you assemble an exceptional team that will bring it to fruition.

“There’s nothing like Avenue in Bellevue,” says Rennie, describing the exclusive community where you can live, or stay as a hotel guest. You can ride the elevator down to the Plaza level to get your favorite latte, chat with friends or neighbors, then ride up and go to the gym or get a massage in the spa. “This is one of those rare environments where you may never see your parking stall because you can walk and do everything right there. I think it’s going to be very exciting.”

In a career that spans more than 40 years, Bob Rennie has developed brand recognition for his company, the ubiquitous rennie. In the 1990s, Rennie expanded his job description from realtor to marketer to developer’s consultant to city builder. In his hometown of Vancouver in British Columbia, Canada, Rennie has marketed most of the city’s landmark projects over the past 20 years—from One Wall Centre and the Fairmont Pacific Rim to the Shangri-La and the Vancouver Olympic and Paralympic Village. In Seattle, Rennie worked on the Four Seasons Hotel and various other high-end, luxury developments.

“I am hands on with this project,” says Rennie, who describes his company’s role on Avenue as social engineering. Working closely with Lakha, the architecture and design teams, Rennie identifies a demographic for each tower and envisions what life for residents might look like from a design, product, amenities, and social aspect.

“It’s so refreshing to work with someone who is building a legacy project right in his own backyard,” says Rennie of Andy Lakha. “Avenue is destined to become an energy center,” he says, “and the consumer that has discretionary money to spend is looking for an energy center. I always say that the wealthy can afford sweatpants. Yes, they want all the security and services of hyper luxury, but they want a casual, liveable community. Their backyard becomes great shopping, their backyard becomes great restaurants, it becomes the place you meet a neighbor for coffee. But it’s all an elevated experience. I think we’ve accomplished that here.”